Tag Archives: Employment

After careful consideration….

When job hunting, this is an automated message we’ve all received and we know that those words isn’t the beginning of a new and fruitful relationship. Fair enough and not that much of a problem; an organisation should recruit the person they believe can do the job.

No, what bothers me is the time lapsed between the application and this answer. Yesterday I submitted my CV to a large company for a Communications Director position. I immediately received a confirmation that they had received my application. And 32 minutes later I received this follow-up message:

Thank you for your recent application to XXXX.

After careful consideration we have decided not to progress with your application at this point in time as we have identified candidates that more closely match our requirements.

Please continue to review our current opportunities on the careers page of our website at xxx, to ensure consideration for future roles.

Thank you for the interest you’ve shown and may we wish you every success in your search for a new role.

Yours sincerely,

XXX Talent Acquisition

Really? My application was carefully considered for the whole of 32 minutes. And that during a time of day when not many are at the office. How careful can you be in 32 minutes? Personally, I not only find this behaviour unprofessional I also find it rude.

I understand we all play the Taleo guessing game and unless my CV doesn’t contain the correct key words it won’t show up. But I would advice the responsible managers to programme an automated timer to the answer and hold it for 24 hours. It would at least make you look minimally professional.

 

How do you identify curious?

No, I don’t mean curious as in strange, but curious as in ever wanting to find out what’s behind the next stone. Curious as in interested to learn and to find out more.

And I am talking about curious employees. Employees t that are willing to learn new things, employees that are willing to learn new thinking, or at least doesn’t mind thinking that there might be other mindsets than the ones well-known.

As any change specialist will tell one key in change is to find one or few champions and instil in them the courage to change. And this probably something of the most difficult there is – to embrace change. Even though I am now living and working in my sixth country, I don’t know how open to change I actually am.

Currently involved in a change process there is one big new development that potentially will be an industry shake up, but it will take time and effort – and curiosity. It isn’t for everyone, there are many employees that are happy to go to work, do their job as well as they can, and then go home. And like in any context all types are needed. But for a company to survive, we also need the shakers, the curious that are willing to look behind the stone to learn a new mind-set and a new way of thinking.

So how do you identify these employees?

“The wrong people shared it” a tale of a Social Media campaign gone awry

One of the downsides with having a mother tongue spoken by 10 million people is exactly that. But I wanted to give this a try anyway because it is such a good example of Social Media and an organisation that maybe has a wee bit left to go…

It started on November 11 with a letter from the Swedish Trade Union Confederation, it’s the largest Swedish Union and very powerful Union at that and solidly leftist. No surprises there. And let it be know that I have no problems with Unions, on the contrary I have almost always been a card-carrying member. Not so much maybe in a left-wing Union, but in a Union representing me. I feel that as an employee we sometimes are the underdogs and we may need support. It’s akin to having a home insurance, you don’t need it on a daily basis but once something happens its good to have.

The Swedish Trade Union Confederation in west Sweden is vying for more members. Nothing strange with that, all organisations wants to grow. They are using their Facebook page, nothing strange there either. It’s more the way they are doing it and how they address their future members. It is an accusing text in the form of a letter saying that “Your back will never hurt. You’ve been riding on others’ all your life” after which it goes on to list the Union successes e.g. 8 hour working day, holiday etc…

However, when the letter took a national viral spin it was taken down from the Facebook page. Admittedly it was shared for the “wrong” reasons, no one agreed with the accusing approach in the text something that seemed to surprise the local Union and it was taken down because “It was shared by the Tory side” i.e. by the wrong people having the wrong political views.

And this is the crux with Social Media, we can’t control the response, what we can do is our best to use the channels we are comfortable with but we don’t know if the “wrong side” will pick it up and share it. What we also can do is to do our homework first and see to that we have all the answers for come what may. It’s called a communication strategy and it’s not sexy but it’s what makes campaigns work.

So the next time before you publish something, ask yourself “What if” your life as [Social Media] communicator will be so much easier.

You’ll find the link to the text here: http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/facket-du-har-ju-ridit-pa-andras-ryggar-i-hela-ditt-liv/

Interview hoopla

This article on BBC ”Interview abuse http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20140115-interview-abuse” made me think of my own experiences in the area – and haven’t we all been there?

I can understand that employers want to ensure as much as possible that they hire the right person, and yes, it is true a bad CV doesn’t exist but will this extensive recruitment process result in hiring the right person? For me this is more proof that the employer doesn’t know what they want, which is really bad because if we posit that a recruitment is done to fill a void and a corporate need, does not knowing what you want when filling a position bode well for the future for the company as one can assume that the corporate strategies are not that well-developed?

I’d love to hear from you, what do you think?

After careful consideration….

That is a message we’ve all received and we know that those words isn’t the beginning of a new and fruitful relationship. And that’s fair enough and not that much of a problem, an organisation should recruit the person they believe can do the job.

No, what bothers me is the time lapsed between the application and this answer. Friday I submitted my CV to a large industry association for a Communications Director position I immediately received a confirmation that they had received my application. And 15 minutes later. Yes, you read correct fifteen minutes I received this follow-up message:

Thank you for your recent application to XXXX.

After careful consideration we have decided not to progress with your application at this point in time as we have identified candidates that more closely match our requirements.

Please continue to review our current opportunities on the careers page of our website at xxx, to ensure consideration for future roles.

Thank you for the interest you’ve shown and may we wish you every success in your search for a new role.

Yours sincerely,

XXX Talent Acquisition

Really? My application was carefully considered for the whole of 15 minutes after which I was considered too light. How careful can you be in 15 minutes? Personally, I not only find this behaviour unprofessional I also find it rude. If this is an automated answer based on the fact that my CV doesn’t have enough of the keywords the recruiting team are searching for, programme an automated timer to the answer and hold it for 24 hours. It would at least make you look minimally professional.

 

In recruitment – should the cobbler stick to his last?

Are we forever stuck to working at the same type of companies? Are consultants always doomed to be consultants? Big company employees always big company employee? A public servant always a public servant?

I just ask myself that question, when reading profiles on LinkedIn there always seem to be a pattern of the above – you start out as say a consultant, are you forever going to stay in that role? Why does it seem that a willing candidate can’t change from one type of working environment to another? Are the working environments that different? Of course there will be new ways of working on a new work place, there always is.  There will be a period of adaptation, of course. That’s what changes means, so there are no news there.

This is not a new phenomena so it isn’t linked to the crisis and more cautious recruitment policies. It’s not even a new trend, it just seems to be a rule laid down in stone.

So why is it then that it seems virtually impossible to make these cross-over changes?