Category Archives: Social Media

Sponsored journalism – always dishonest and lacking in integrity?

In Sweden, and I guess elsewhere as well, there’s an ongoing discussion about sponsored journalism and that it’s dishonest to the readers. But is it? Can it even be that it is more honest?

We all know it – good journalism cost. It’s that simple, and more and more we’re getting used to “free” journalism, so it’s harder for the traditional outlets to finance their business. I put free between brackets because there is no such thing as free, sooner or later someone must pay. But I’m more discussing integrity here. Because there is a sense that sponsored journalism lacks integrity and only exist as a kind of infotainment. This time around it was a piece on the Swedish radio about one major Swedish newspaper that had started a co-operation with an auction house and thanks to that was able to offer high-quality articles on the art market. The sponsored journalists did not hide under which circumstances the articles have been produced. In other words it was clear that the content is produced in collaboration with this auction house. The radio journalists approached the subject under the assumption that sponsored journalism is dishonest and lacking integrity, and that “their” type of journalism is so much better. But “their” journalism is state sponsored through taxes, so how free is that? It is perceived so because we don’t see the direct relationship between the funds and the result, but is not only a perception? Can’t it be that sponsored content is much more honest and show higher integrity because the sender is (or at least should be) clearly identified and I as a reader know this? If I know that an article on pain management is written by pharma company producing a certain pain remedy I take that into account when I read the text. When I read a text by a journalist specialised in pharma I can’t be sure of the sources, and as a PR with a fair few years of competence in working with the press under my belt, I know for a fact that “sponsored” content i.e. successful pitch, is not unusual.

Can it be that openly sponsored journalism has higher integrity than we give it credit for? What say you?

Annonser

Cyber Insurance – the New Black?

Cyber Insurance, the New Black?

by Sara Goldberger

Cyber attacks and cyber insurance, it’s on everybody’s lips and on the surface it seems relatively simple – a breach, there are victims, data is lost, and the insurance company pays up. It doesn’t seem that different from other insurances. With all of the reports of breaches over the past few years, some very alarming in terms of their scale, everyone wants cyber insurance coverage and believes this will protect them.

But there are many misconceptions about cyber insurance. For example, a UK Government survey last year showed that 52% of CEOs believe that they have coverage, yet less than 10% actually do. So what exactly is “cyber insurance,” what does it cover, and how does it cover cross-border crime?

Cyber-insurance protects businesses and individuals from Internet-based risks. Many insurers say that risks of this nature are typically excluded from traditional commercial, general liability policies. Coverage provided by cyber insurance policies may include:

  • First-party coverage against losses such as data destruction, extortion, theft, hacking, and denial of service attacks;
  • Liability coverage indemnifying companies for losses to others caused, for example, by errors and omissions, failure to safeguard data, or defamation;
  • Other benefits including regular security-audit, post-incident public relations and investigative expenses, and criminal reward funds.

There are several considerations to keep in mind when buying cyber insurance. Costs vary widely, but to purchase a $1M policy typically costs $5K to $25K per year for a medium-sized company. However, cyber policies might not pay out if your claim is delayed. Which raises the question: what happens if your organization suffers a breach during the coverage period but do not become aware for some time? An insurer may also not cover your claim based upon employee negligence or if your organisation failed to adhere to minimum required security practices specified in the policy.

And what happens if you suffer a cyber attack? Interestingly, 81% of US companies that have bought cyber insurance have never filed a claim. The median-sized claim is $76,984, though there are a few that are much bigger. It is those outliers that push the mean average claim up to $673,767. And what expenses does the claim cover? More than half of the claims that insurers pay out on cyber policies include the expense of legal and forensic specialists. Over 40% of claims recover the cost of notification to affected individuals and the cost of providing credit monitoring services.

In the Global Economic Crime Survey 2016 Report, cybercrime climbs to the second most reported economic crime affecting 32% of organisations, while at the same time close to 60% of the surveyed organisations do not even have a cyber incident response plan in place. Many companies also report feeling a lack of support and a notion of “not knowing what to do when an attack happens.” Organisations such as IT and auditing consultancies offer some help and support, but they rarely have a corporate-wide view. That’s an area where two recently formed organisations – Cyber Rescue Alliance and the Global Cyber Alliance can make a difference.

Cyber Rescue Alliance; is a Pan-European organisation aimed at helping the approximately 12,000 European SMEs that hold sensitive data on over 5,000 individuals. The organisation delivers a Comprehensive Business Response solution that includes instant, practical crisis management guidance and tiered response capability from pre-vetted organisations. In other words, the solution offers coordinated, tangible and practical business assistance across the full spectrum of challenges that follow a breach. In the event of an attack, Cyber Rescue Alliance will provide practical help and assistance to the many smaller businesses that can’t invest in a full-time CISO or PR Consultant with those services in order to mitigate the impact of a cyber-attack. In other words, it is the across-corporate, one-stop approach that makes Cyber Rescue Alliance unique.

Global Cyber Alliance (GCA) is unique as it partners across borders and sectors. Based on the organisation’s mantra “Do Something. Measure It.” GCA’s first effort is to tackle phishing, which is often the source of a breach. GCA is partnering with several organisations to implement two solutions:  to drive the deployment of DMARC and use of secure DNS services, and then to measure the effect — so that we all may accelerate eradication of phishing as a systemic cyber risk.

While addressing, and responding to, the needs of different sized organisations, Cyber Rescue Alliance and GCA are working together, thus ensuring that perhaps one of the biggest business problems of our time – cyber-attacks – are given the attention and solutions it needs. Only through this cooperation can we ensure that companies are implementing the best security practices available in order that cyber insurance policies will indeed insure them against these risks.

The author, Sara Goldberger, is the Head of Communications Global Operations and IT at Zurich Insurance Group and Board Member of GCA partner, Cyber Rescue Alliance. You can follow her on Twitter @saragoldberger.

Editor’s Note: The views expressed by the author are not necessarily those of the Global Cyber Alliance. 

Initially published on – http://globalcyberalliance.blogspot.ch/2016/05/cyber-insurance-new-black.html

Change at the Grassroots – How to Attract Government Attention

Being heard and enacting social reform is not just a problem under authoritarian regimes. Even in democracies, where newspapers have been filled with headlines on people crying out for change, we see little development or legislative change.

The Occupy Movement saw thousands of people protest the international capitalist system, camping in sub-zero temperatures for months on end; while thousands of students in the UK took to the streets to protest against rising tuition fees and its effects on social mobility. From Syrian citizens to Sri Lanka’s Tamils, from American activists to China’s Tibetan monks, people in every corner of the world are crying out for change.

The only two examples (I can think of) where the grassroots managed was the Pirate movement against the Anti-counterfeiting Trade Agreement, ACTA, that got voted down in the European Parliament, and the tragic desperation of Tarek al-Tayeb Mohamed Bouazizi that led to the Arab Spring.

With little relative change, it begs the question, is anyone listening? What about us ‘little people’? Also, do we want it? Because while it is enticing with the image of David vs. Goliath, the fact is that some of the changes that happened through grassroot protests can be considered as revolutions through violence.

Here are a couple of points which will help you achieve attention of governments and help you lobby your case. In short, persistence and preparation are key.

Article originally published on Grassroot Diplomat: http://www.grassrootdiplomat.org/news/2015/5/11/change-at-the-grassroots-how-to-attract-government-attention

“The wrong people shared it” a tale of a Social Media campaign gone awry

One of the downsides with having a mother tongue spoken by 10 million people is exactly that. But I wanted to give this a try anyway because it is such a good example of Social Media and an organisation that maybe has a wee bit left to go…

It started on November 11 with a letter from the Swedish Trade Union Confederation, it’s the largest Swedish Union and very powerful Union at that and solidly leftist. No surprises there. And let it be know that I have no problems with Unions, on the contrary I have almost always been a card-carrying member. Not so much maybe in a left-wing Union, but in a Union representing me. I feel that as an employee we sometimes are the underdogs and we may need support. It’s akin to having a home insurance, you don’t need it on a daily basis but once something happens its good to have.

The Swedish Trade Union Confederation in west Sweden is vying for more members. Nothing strange with that, all organisations wants to grow. They are using their Facebook page, nothing strange there either. It’s more the way they are doing it and how they address their future members. It is an accusing text in the form of a letter saying that “Your back will never hurt. You’ve been riding on others’ all your life” after which it goes on to list the Union successes e.g. 8 hour working day, holiday etc…

However, when the letter took a national viral spin it was taken down from the Facebook page. Admittedly it was shared for the “wrong” reasons, no one agreed with the accusing approach in the text something that seemed to surprise the local Union and it was taken down because “It was shared by the Tory side” i.e. by the wrong people having the wrong political views.

And this is the crux with Social Media, we can’t control the response, what we can do is our best to use the channels we are comfortable with but we don’t know if the “wrong side” will pick it up and share it. What we also can do is to do our homework first and see to that we have all the answers for come what may. It’s called a communication strategy and it’s not sexy but it’s what makes campaigns work.

So the next time before you publish something, ask yourself “What if” your life as [Social Media] communicator will be so much easier.

You’ll find the link to the text here: http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/facket-du-har-ju-ridit-pa-andras-ryggar-i-hela-ditt-liv/

When corporate strategy is undone by your employees surpassing identified standards what do you do?

I’m reading up for the last home work piece for my Masters in Corporate Communications, Organisational Identity (and I find it so boring) and one the required articles discuss corporate strategy and how that and organisational identity can support each other. But the interesting issue appear when your employees undermine any strategy by upping the ante and actually doing better than the strategy sets out.

To give an example: hotel maids. You know how we are all asked if we mind keeping our towels more than one night? The request usually comes with a long explanation on how much water this will save, and I don’t know what. But whatever, I haven’t got a problem with the request. Sloth that I am, I admit to using my towels at home more than once so it’s OK to do so when I stay at a hotel too. Thus, I dutifully hang my towels (to be reused) on the designated hook in the bathroom. But, more often than not, when I get back there are new and fresh towels on the aforementioned hooks. Not that I mind, but it seems like the head quarter strategy haven’t made it to “the floor.” There might be many reasons for this; maybe it’s  easier for the maids to change all the towels rather than checking which guest is OK with keeping them, maybe they are disgruntled and this is their only way to protest? Is it because that these employees don’t feel a part of the organisational identity, and that they simply don’t care?

One word, I do not in any way or form criticise the maids.

Whatever the reason this doesn’t work, it does diminish a nice approach, all the calculations and, above all, it makes the hotel [chain] look like they’re not on top of it. Is it lacking internal communications? Is the measure offending the maids in their work ethics and professional pride?

The reasons are many but the question is one: How do you align all staff in the [new] corporate strategies?

How to fail in public affairs and communications

This is an exact copy of an email we just received. Seriously? They are congratulating an outgoing Member of European Parliament to his recent win (we lost.)

Dear Mr. Engström,

Congratulations on your recent election to the European Parliament.

I am writing to introduce you to our communications company, ALYS Web Design. With over 10 years of solid experience working in Brussels for both corporate and institutional clients, including several Members of the European Parliament, we are at your service for all your digital communication needs (website, e-newsletter, social media…).

I would invite you to explore our extensive portfolio and would be happy to meet with you and your team at your convenience to explain our working methods and answer any questions you may have.
Yours sincerely,
Pierre Neuray
Manager
For a quick glimpse at some of our ‘political’ references:
www.robertrochefort.eu
www.didierreynders.be

So dear agency, Alys, do your homework before you start spamming us.

 

Martin Schulz, European elections and Social Media

I found this excellent blog post ”What Happened During Schulz’s #AskMartin Chat 0n Social Media” that discusses certain aspects about Martin Schulz’ chat #AskMartin. The chat took place May 19 and is a part of Mr Schulz bid to the post as President of the European Commission. Actually this is a post nor he nor his competing candidates actually will be elected to by the EU citizens since the Commission, including its President, is agreed by the European Parliament. So in itself it’s a strange situation.

As much of this election campaign this event was rather discreet, in fact the chat was a complete surprise, I only noticed it when RTs started to appear in my feed, and I concur with the critics that the answers were few, far in between and bland. Fine, he got 1 700 tweets during the hour allotted to the Twitter chat, it goes without saying that no one can answer that many answers at least not over the course of an hour. Still the answers that were given could have been more poignant.

But as Mr Ricorda rightly points out in his post, there are technical limitations to how many answers you can provide. But what communications strategy doesn’t take that into account? I must say from my angle it seems like Mr Schulz team had a brain wave:

We must do something with Social Media! Twitter! He should Tweet. That will make him stand out as a cool politician. And German (German since EP elections still are national) twitters is a really interesting demographic group. And properly managed we’ll get a really good reach.

I can hear the applause.

More than any other tool in the communications mix, technology is a factor in any Social Media strategy and if not managed properly you will end up like Mr Schulz, kind and well-meaning, but a bit lost in [Social Media] space. Technology has to be taken into account and managed. Questions like:

  • Can others in his entourage answer tweets while keeping the authenticity?
  • Can we continue to answer questions even after the chat is closed?
  • Can we create a pop-up page on the campaign website and answer the questions by grouping them in themes?

There are many other questions to be asked and answered. But as long as there is a sense of no one even thinking about the basics before organising an [on-line] event like this it will only be considered as a well-meant measure that got botched.